Recipes

Grandma Hutchinson’s Polish Pierogies


We have a guest today! Emily Fagan of thiswifestyle.com was kind enough to share her Grandma Hutchinson’s Polish Pierogie recipe with us – We can’t wait to try it! Check out the recipe, as well as a little information about Emily, her blog and her Grandma below!

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Hello! My name is Emily Fagan and I am the writer of the blog This Wifestyle. I am so honored to be sharing a recipe today from my Grandma Hutchinson’s food splattered recipe book. Something I love about this blog is that stories and principles from our grandparents’ time are cherished and shared with the world! Today I am going to let you in on part of my family, and share one of my grandma’s recipes.

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Heritage is a part of every family. Where do we come from? What is our story? I remember being around 7 years old when my Grandma Hutchinson started sharing her heritage. She proudly told me that she was 100% Polish and that her family came to the United States in the early 1900s. Both her parents could speak Polish and it was a HUGE deal (and disappointment to my great grandparents) that she married a man who was NOT Polish. Nevertheless, she has made sure to pass down some parts of her heritage to my mother, and to me.

Pierogies has been a part of my life for as long as I can remember. Whenever we would visit my grandparents for a holiday, pierogies were always at the dining table. Over the years, I have been able to help my Grandma Hutchinson make pierogies and she would always talk about how this dish was a part of her upbringing as well. Her mother would also make pierogies on holidays to share with the family (pierogies are very labor intensive, so they are not the easiest dish to serve every night with dinner).

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According to the Culinary Arts Institute’s Adventures in Cooking series, Polish food is liked because it is hospitable. And although it has traces of German and Russian characteristics, it is something entirely of it’s own due to this hospitality.[1] The Polish people make a big deal of Christmas Eve and serve a huge feast on this day. It is customary that a seat is left empty at the table for any guests that may choose to arrive (even if none are expected). [2] Finally, Polish food is heavily influenced by natural resources in Poland. Smoked sausage is common due to the abundance of juniper wood, sour cream is a staple because of the successful dairy industry, and cabbage frequents the dinner table due to plentiful crops.[3]Growing up, I was not aware of all of this. I DID know that my Grandma Hutchinson loved making pierogies because of her Polish heritage and as a result, I developed a connection with pierogies and plan on sharing this part of my heritage with my own children one day. I believe we are entering into a time when families are losing sight of where they came from. I cling to my heritage because I think it’s important to know where I come from. I hope you enjoy my grandma’s recipe!

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Grandma Hutchinson’s Pierogi Recipe

Ingredients for Pierogi Dough

6oz of Cream Cheese

4 Cups of Flour

1 Cup of Water

Ingredients for Sweet Cheese Filling

1.5 Cups of Ricotta Cheese

1 Egg

3 Tablespoons Sugar

¼ Cup Raisins

½ Teaspoon of Vanilla Extract

¼ Teaspoon Cinnamon

Directions

  • The first task you’re going to do is pour 4 cups of flour into a bowl (Kitchen Aid mixing bowl or regular bowl that you can use a hand mixer with).

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Slowly mix in the cream cheese and the egg. Mix together until the ingredients resemble a doughy consistency. Set aside.

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  • Next, add 3 cups of water to a cooking pot. Add in ¼ cups of raisins and bring to a boil. Boil for 10 minutes.
  • While waiting for the raisins to boil, add all of the other ingredients needed for the pierogi filling to a bowl and mix together. Once the raisins are done boiling, drain the water and add the raisins to the cheese mixture.

Set this mixture in the freezer for about ten minutes while you complete the next task.

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  • Take your pierogi dough and separate it into four sections. With each section, you are going to follow the steps below until you are out of dough.
  • Spread flour out onto the countertop and then add one section of dough. With a rolling pin, roll the dough out to a very thin layer ( like sugar cookie dough).
  • Using the top of the bowl, cut medium sized circles out of the dough. After your dough is cut into circles, pick up the excess dough and place it with your other piles.
  • Fill a large cooking pot up with water and add a little olive oil and salt. Set the burner to high and wait for a boil.
  • Take your pierogi filling out of the freezer and use a tablespoon to scoop some out and place in the middle of each dough circle.
  • Using some tap water, wet a brush or your fingers and coat the outside of the pierogi circles with a thin layer of water. This will create an adhesive to close up your pierogi. Fold one side over to the other and press down on the sides.
  • Once your first batch is done, add your pierogies to the boiling water. Let your pierogies boil for 10 minutes. Remove one at a time and set on a plate to dry. Repeat these steps until all of your pierogies are cooked.
  • After your pierogies have been boiled, you’re going to need to cook them on a skillet. Add butter and place your burner to medium heat.

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Add a few pierogies and flip them back and forth on the burner until they start to brown. Finally, use a sprinkle of sugar on top of your pierogi before you eat! I hope you enjoyed this family recipe! Check out my blog for more recipes, DIYs, and random millennial thoughts!

-Emily Fagan

thiswifestyle.com

[1] Culinary Arts Institute Adventures in Cooking series, 7

[2] Adventures in Cooking, 8

[3] Adventures in Cooking, 9

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